ResilientAfrica Network

Collaborative Resilience Innovation Design for Food Security and Diversified Livelihoods in the Face of Rapid Urbanization (CRID4FAL)

In sourcing for innovations, RAN is applying a Collaborative Resilience Innovation Design (CRID) approach that uses a highly collaborative intervention design process in which multi-disciplinary teams of experts, scholars and stakeholders are invited to develop system level interventions in a CRID Workshop. It is based on the thinking that innovative ideas can be co-created collaboratively by experienced stakeholders working with the target communities. The CRID approach is specifically designed to generate “platform-oriented solutions” i.e. solutions that result in a platform that can facilitate multiple development functions instead of a discrete project.

The CRID4FAL challenge call seeks to attract multi-disciplinary teams of innovators and stakeholders to participate in a co-creation process to identify, develop and incubate a combination of innovative projects in support of system-level, platform-oriented interventions in the target community. This call is open to entities or organizations interested in addressing the effects of Rapid Urbanization vis-à-vis climate change within the target communities of Northern, Upper East and Greater Accra Regions of Ghana. Potential applicant organizations may include colleges, universities, autonomous or semi-autonomous research institutes, foundations, NGOs, faith-based organizations, community based organizations and civic groups. Applications will be accepted up to 24th October 2016 at 11:59 pm (GMT). Shortlisted applicants will be invited to participate in a co-creation process to develop a set of CRID4FALprojects that have shared platform integration features. Teams behind the best projects from the co-creation process will be funded to implement their projects.

In Phase 1, grants ranging from US$ 30,000 to US$ 100,000 will be awarded to teams formed around projects from the CRID4FAL Co-creation Process. Winners of Phase 1 qualify to compete for Phase 2 grants ranging from US$ 100,000 to US$ 200,000. More..

Brief Overview of ResilientAfrica Network (RAN)

The ResilientAfrica Network (RAN) funded by USAID is a partnership targeting 20 partner universities in 16 African countries. The main agenda of RAN is to strengthen resilience of communities vulnerable to shocks and stresses in Sub-Saharan Africa through university led-local African innovative solutions. ResilientAfrica Network (RAN) is led by Makerere University, with the secretariat at School of Public Health. It is one of eight university development labs under the Higher Education Solutions Network (HESN) of USAID’s Global Development Lab. RAN’s core partners are Tulane University’s Disaster Resilience Leadership Academy (DRLA), Stanford University, and the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). RAN comprises four Resilience Innovation Labs (RILabs) each working with Partner Universities and focusing on different thematic areas as summarized in in the figure below

Note:
For more information and to apply, please visit grants.ranlab.org. Applicants may email any questions on the call or on any aspect of the application process to support.warilab@ranlab.org or call +256 414 343 597

This call has three priority intervention pathways for resilience building around rapid urbanization and its associated shocks and stresses.

Based on data from the community consultations and the analysis of system level relationships at the ISWs, three priority intervention pathways emerged for West Africa.

Pathway 1: Agriculture and Marketing
In the face of rapid urbanization in West Africa, most the sub region’s people heavily depend on rain-fed agriculture and other natural resources directly affected by the vagaries of nature. Bush fallowing and other agriculture practices, which traditionally restored soil fertility and reduced the buildup of pests and diseases, are disappearing from the agricultural landscape. Overall, the soil resource is being degraded, with a consequent reduction in crop yield. Presently, the challenge of improving productivity without compromising soil sustainability is so large that farmers will need to combine gains from improved germplasm with complementary improvements in their management of soil fertility. The communities are stuck in a cycle of low productivity and skewed markets in which they have limited leverage.

Pathway 2: Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH)
Over the years due to the densely populated nature of the urban areas, compounded by the abuse of available water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) facilities, weak law enforcement and lack of good WASH practices, achieving long-term sustainability in WASH intervention remains a daunting challenge. Access to water and sanitation is a fundamental human right and essential to life, health and dignity. WASH+H describes all issues that relate to the health and wellbeing of the people. It includes water, sanitation and hygienic behavior of the people. Waste management problems are well entrenched in the study areas (target communities) and have also adversely affected the health of community members. Provision of adequate sanitation services is equally important. Proper disposal of all waste, as well as, control of the carriers of communicable diseases, including mosquitoes, rats, mice, and flies, is crucial to mitigate health risks and preventing epidemics. But the optimum benefit from water and sanitation interventions can only be achieved if communities and individuals are made aware of the links between hygiene practices, poor sanitation, health, and disease.

Pathway 3: Livelihood Diversification & Financial Inclusion
Two of the target communities are highly dependent on rain-fed subsistence agriculture that is vulnerable to adverse effects of rapid urbanization and climate variability. Alternative livelihood opportunities are limited and access to financial services remains a big challenge. Non-diversification is caused by the lack of viable livelihood options that are contextually relevant, easy to implement and highly profitable. It is also caused by low financial inclusion and a pervasive culture of not saving as one of the biggest impediments to investment

Click here for more about the CRID4FAL Pathways

Download the complete CRID4FAL Document

The WA RILAb Collaborative Resilience Innovation Design (CRID) workshop analyzed the three priority intervention pathways and developed three innovation challenges or platforms to be addressed.

Up to four Phase 1 grants ranging between US$ 30,000 to 100,000 are anticipated to be awarded to teams formed around the final micro-projects selected from those co-created by the co-creation team. Winners of Phase 1 Grants will then qualify to compete for Phase 2 grants. Up to two grants ranging between US$ 100,000 and 200,000) will be awarded. It is envisioned that the grants will support development of complementary innovative approaches and technologies that will strengthen resilience to the recurrent effects of rapid urbanization in West Africa. [Note: Submission of initial ideas will not automatically mean that an idea is eligible for funding. Eligible ideas for funding will be co-created by the participants of the co-creation workshop. RAN reserves the right to change the projected award amounts or the number of anticipated awards.]

We invite initial original ideas in any of the 3 innovation challenge categories from intending co-creators as below
Innovation Challenge 1: Transform Agricultural Practices & Markets

In the face of rapid urbanization in West Africa, most of the sub region’s population relies heavily on rain-fed agriculture and other natural resources directly affected by the vagaries of nature. The growing frequency and severity of extreme events such as droughts, floods, and heat waves, along with shifting rainfall patterns, threaten to overwhelm the natural resilience of West African communities, risking livelihoods and food security.
Subsistence farming is the mainstay of communities that experience shocks and stressors arising from migration, drought and sometimes flooding. Overdependence on rain-fed agriculture, small farm sizes, low technology, inadequate start-up capital, and the non-existence of value addition tend to increase vulnerability to food insecurity as a result of poor knowledge about how to prepare nutritious local recipes. Thus, locally available rich foods are not optimized. Lack of direct access to buyers, poor smallholder cohesion, lack of inputs, and low price leverage all affect the farmer’s income. The fallows, which traditionally restored soil fertility and reduced the buildup of pests and diseases, are disappearing from the agricultural landscape. The soil resource is being degraded, with a consequent reduction in crop yield. Presently the challenge of improving productivity without compromising sustainability is so large that farmers will need to combine gains from improved germplasm with complementary improvements in their management of soil fertility.

The Innovation Challenge:
This platform seeks solutions that disrupt the status quo by substantially building agency of smallholder farmers to have more control over efficient agricultural production processes, marketing and consumption of local foods and soil fertility management. The platform has three innovative ideas/modules highlighted as follows:

Innovative Idea 1: Use Appropriate Technology to Increase Agriculture Output.
Develop low cost environmentally friendly approaches to increase yield per acreage by employing indigenous knowledge, resources, technologies which encompass gender and ICT platforms to improve access to markets and to increase income. Particularly encouraged are proposals that provide innovative approaches to promoting This is made possible by the generous support of the American people through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). The content are the responsibility of ResilientAfrica Network and do not necessarily reflect the views of USAID or the United States Government In the face of rapid urbanization in West Africa, most of the sub region’s population relies heavily on rain-fed agriculture and other natural resources directly affected by the vagaries of nature. The growing frequency and severity of extreme events such as droughts, floods, and heat waves, along with shifting rainfall patterns, threaten to overwhelm the natural resilience of West African communities, risking livelihoods and food security. Group-based access to markets; Gender-equitable benefit sharing mechanism; Use of established ICT market platforms; etc.

Innovative Idea 2: Value addition to locally available foods
Develop approaches for piloting, evaluating and scaling innovations that address key constraints related to alternative packages of assistance to Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) attempting to anticipate and take advantage of the growing markets for processed and perishable foods; Small-scale processing technology that is user friendly and adds value to indigenous locally produced crops, e.g., millet, fonio, groundnuts, etc.; Indigenous technologies for food preservation; etc.

Innovative Idea 3: Improve Soil Fertility and Agricultural waste reuse
Develop models or approaches appropriate for integrated soil fertility management and maximizing the use of agricultural waste so as to improve the incomes of smallholder farmers..

Innovation Challenge 2: Community-owned value addition

WASH is a major aspect of the health of the people in the target communities. The ever-increasing population, driven by high birth rates and in-migration, has outstripped residential and social amenities, water resources, and the capacity of sanitation and hygiene infrastructure. This has led to an overall deterioration in the quality of the environment. Over the years, significant investments by government in water, waste management, sanitation and hygiene have not translated into ensuring sustainable availability and access to sufficient water of good quality. Organizations working to promote WASH are challenged by deplorable attitudes, behaviours, and practices in the urban and peri-urban areas. Use of untreated wastewater for vegetable farming is widespread across the metropolis. Innovation Challenge: We are seeking innovative solutions to develop models and approaches for improving behaviours and attitudes while creating innovative technologies to promoting WASH. These interventions would engage the community by leveraging existing traditional platforms for community engagement. Some innovative solutions may include:

Innovative Idea 1: Household Water Management and Reuse
Develop models and approaches or technologies for promoting sustainable water supply that would reduce vulnerability to household water shortage and promote opportunities for multiple uses of water.

Innovative Idea 2: Solid and Liquid Waste Management
Develop models and approaches or technologies for promoting sustainable solid and liquid waste management to reduce vulnerability of households to communicable diseases and in a manner that also builds bridges for agricultural production.

Innovative Idea 3: Health Seeking Behaviour
This is made possible by the generous support of the American people through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). The content are the responsibility of ResilientAfrica Network and do not necessarily reflect the views of USAID or the United States Government. Develop models and approaches for promoting and catalyzing health and improving health-seeking behaviour.

Innovation Challenge 3: Promote Livelihood Diversification & Financial Inclusion

Entrepreneurship is important to the economic and social development of a community. Through innovation, entrepreneurs create new, competitive markets and businesses. This leads to job creation, which has a multiplying effect on the economy. Potential entrepreneurs in West African communities (particularly Ghana) are constrained by the lack of entrepreneurial skills and the limited access to finance/start-up capital. The Government of Ghana’s (GoG) Microfinance and Small Loans Centre has a mission “to provide micro and small loans for start-ups and small businesses with fast, easy and accessible microcredit and small loans to grow and expand their businesses as well as to enhance job and wealth creation”. But its services do not reach majority of those most in need. Other microcredit facilities also follow the line of traditional lending institutions by demanding collateral for borrowing. Existing entrepreneurship skills development programs are also few and not well focused. Upgrading skills can be a key channel to improve productivity and incomes in the informal economy and open opportunities to link with the formal economy.

Innovation Challenge: We are looking for innovations that can develop models and approaches or technologies for promoting life and entrepreneurship skills in target communities, Tamale, Navrongo and Ashaiman. With coordinated support, interventions on this platform can greatly benefit from existing financial services for business start-ups. Innovative ideas include:

Innovative Idea 1: Life and entrepreneurship skills development
Develop models and approaches or technologies for promoting life and entrepreneurship skills that would reduce vulnerability to food insecurity and promote opportunities for diversified livelihoods taking into account specific contexts in target communities.

Innovative Idea 2: Alternative Livelihood Opportunities
Develop models and approaches or technologies for supporting local business ideas to grow into viable alternative livelihood enterprises.

These three innovation challenges will therefore form the core themes for CRID4FAL. A detailed description of the challenges is presented here in the CRID4FAL Document

In conclusion, what you need to know:
• Innovations are not limited to technologies but could be approaches or models
• An idea may not be new – the innovation could be in its social application

Eligible applicants

Individuals or teams of individuals as well as entities or organizations working in similar domain areas in the target communities of Ghana, Mali and Senegal, all of which are under the West Africa RILab, are eligible to apply. Entities or organisations willing to partner with those working within the target communities (as may be identified through the co- creation process) are also welcome to apply. Potential applicant organizations may include colleges, universities, autonomous or semi-autonomous research institutes, foundations, NGOs, faith-based organizations, community based organizations and civic groups. All applicants in this category must be legally recognized entities, formally registered under applicable law, and they should attach evidence to that effect on their application.

Other General Requirements

Entities that are ineligible to apply include: Governments (local and foreign) and their agencies, non-incorporated entities (informal organizations or networks), and individuals not affiliated with any legally recognized entity as specified above. Other entities ineligible to apply include any individuals or organizations participating in, linked to, or sponsoring subversive activities including criminal acts, terrorism or related activities. A responsibility determination will be conducted on all teams applying for the grants for their status regarding United States Government (USG) sanctioned individuals and entities and for the legal nature of their affiliate organization.

Grants may not be awarded to an organization from, or with a principal place of business in, a country subject to trade and economic sanctions administered by the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) of the United States Department of Treasury or to any individual or entity subject to targeted trade and economic sanctions administered by OFAC. The current list of OFAC restricted countries includes Iran, Syria, Cuba, North Korea, and Sudan. However, the list of countries subject to OFAC restrictions may change, and RAN will conduct a final eligibility determination prior to award. All USAID restrictions pertaining to US Government funding apply..

Grant winners must not engage in transactions with, or provide resources or support to, individuals and organizations associated with terrorism, including those individuals or entities that appear on the Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons List maintained by the U.S. Treasury or the United Nations Security designation list.

CRID4FAL seeks applications that have an operational focus in low-income and middle-income countries, as defined by the World Bank. The implementation of the project including pilot 36 and testing will be done primarily in Ghana, and in similar communities within Mali and Senegal, all of which are under the West Africa RILab.

Read More about Eligibility

The following criteria will be used to evaluate applications at the three different stages of the CRID4FAL call. For more information on he judging and selection criteria, please click here.

Phase I (Application)

Evaluation Criteria

Evaluation Aspects

Maximum Score

Alignment to CRID4FAL pathways and RAN’s theory of change for strengthening resilience

Does the proposed solution address the desired resilience outcomes for each innovation challenge?
Does it strengthen human capacity development?

20%

Technical Approach and Methodology

Is the proposed solution innovative? Does it have the potential to disrupt/transform current practices and approaches? Does it constitute a paradigm shift? Is there a plan for awareness creation, imparting knowledge and skills, and skills transfer (capacity building)?

50%

Viability and applicability to local communities

Is it viable for the target communities? Can it be replicated in similar contexts?

20%

Environmental sensitivity

Are proposed approaches and technologies (where appropriate) green and pro-natural resource conservation?

10%

Phase II (Eligibility for further funding)

Evaluation Criteria

Evaluation Aspects

Maximum Score

Technical feasibility

Is the approach or technology technically feasible? Is the solution cost-effective and innovative compared to existing alternatives? Does it have transformative potential? Has it been optimized for efficiency?[By optimization, we mean that the prototype or concept is developed to a model with acceptable or better efficiency than the existing technical standard (e.g. 75% validity for screening tests, 75% efficiency for engines, sufficiently acceptable aesthetics, dexterity and ergonomics (for technology based prototypes) or sufficiently proven cause-effect linkages, input and process considerations and clearly established potential confounders (for a conceptual approach based solution)]
Does project significantly contribute to the associated system-level innovation challenge? Have any applications or other innovation projects been able to leverage the approach or technology? Have unintended consequences been identified and strategies to amplify or mitigate these been put in place?

40%

Business model and Market viability

Have market assessments been done? Has the business model been refined to reflect the market trends? Is the refined diffusion strategy sufficiently plausible?

30%

People (user) aspects

Is the solution user-friendly? Is it easily adoptable? Is it acceptable given the socio-cultural dynamics? Have aspects that require human behavior change been addressed? Has the desired behavior been adequately cultivated? Have agency aspects been promoted?

15%

Evidence of Impact Potential

Is there evidence that the solution has had impact or has the potential to create impact? What format is this evidence? How does it compare with trends of other projects/programs addressing similar challenges?

15%

Phase II (Final evaluation at conclusion of project)

Evaluation Criteria

Evaluation Aspects

Maximum Score

Technical Feasibility

Has the technical approach been optimized? Has approach demonstrated potential for adoption and efficacy in transforming lives of the target community? Has the approach served as a launch pad for different applications or for strengthening the impact of the other innovation projects targeting positive changes in the target community?

15%

Evidence of adoption

Is there evidence that a critical number of users adopted and continued to use the solution? Does the solution demonstrate additional positive spin-offs and/or a paradigmatic shift?

25%

Market viability assessment

Is there evidence that the solution viable given the operational context? Has the business model been refined to maximize scaling potential?

25%

Awareness of and strategies to address/comply with policy and regulatory requirements

Does the team demonstrate sufficient actionable knowledge on the policy and regulatory environment that could impede or catapult scaling of the innovation? Have appropriate strategies to address policy or regulatory impediments been designed?

10%

Stakeholder buy-in

Have critical partnerships for implementation and scale been identified? Has commitment to participate been sought and received favorable response?

25%

What is the objective of this resilience innovation challenge??

The CRID4FAL call focuses on sourcing innovative ideas that contribute to resilience building in areas affected by the effects of rapid urbanization in the context of climate change and food insecurity. The ideas submitted will be used as the basis for selecting a team of co-creators from different disciplinary backgrounds and organizations. The selected team members will then collaborate to transform their ideas into a set of fundable projects that have shared platform integration features (e.g. the ability to use the same mobile-based customer payment system).

The call has 3 priority innovation challenges for resilience building around rapid urbanisation and its associated shocks and stresses

  • Innovation Challenge 1: Transform Agricultural Practices and Markets
  • Innovation Challenge 2: Improve Water, Sanitation, Hygiene & Health
  • Innovation Challenge 3: Promote Livelihood Diversification & Financial Inclusion

What are the levels of funding available under this call?

In the first phase, grants ranging between US$ 30,000 to $100,000 will be awarded to each team formed around the final projects selected from those co-created by the co-creation team. For more information please click Grant Structure

How can I learn more about the effects of rapid urbanization in West Africa?

Links to useful online resources that provide background information on West Africa RILab thematic focus and the resilience dimensions for the West Africa region are available here and the First Annual State of African Resilience Report.

What are the CRID4FAL Grants Call timelines?

Applications for the CRID4FAL Grants Call will be accepted from September 15, 2016 until October 24, 2016 11:59 pm GMT (local time in Ghana). Details are on Timelines

Who is eligible to apply for the Challenge?

Individuals or teams of individuals as well as entities or organizations working in similar domain areas in the target communities of Ghana are eligible to apply. Entities or organisations willing to partner with those working within the target communities (as may be identified through the co-creation process) are also welcome to apply. See more in the  Eligibility section

If I’m not from West Africa RILab can I apply for this Grant?

This Call is OPEN to all applicants with innovations that can solve challenges faced by communities in the West Africa Region. See more about Eligibility

How do I register to apply for the CRID4FAL Grants Call?

To register for the CRID4FAL Grants call, an applicant selects CRID4FAL among the open calls, or on the home page, by clicking on the Apply button. The applicant is advised to first read through the different tracks and select the one they wish to apply for. On Apply Now, click to register and you enter details required to start the registration process

How will the innovation challenges be judged?

A number of members of the Expert Panel (also referred to as Judges) will review all the applications under each track. The Panel may decide to invite shortlisted applicants to a pitch if deemed necessary. The Expert Panel will recommend to RAN and thereafter to USAID the selected teams to participate in the co-creation process from which fundable projects will be developed for support by RAN. Phase 1 applicants to participate in the co-creation process will be announced in November 2016.

How do I choose the specific challenge to apply for?

Applicants can apply for the grants as long as their innovation fits any particular challenge. You can also submit more than one concept to a challenge.

I cannot access the application form, please help

If the applicant experiences any difficulty submitting a proposal through the Online Application Platform, or failure to receive a confirmatory email from the online platform as proof that their proposal has been successfully submitted, the applicant should send an e-mail to the West Africa RILab CRID4FAL support team at: support.warilab@ranlab.org. It is also important to check for the confirmatory email in your spam folder should it not be located in your primary inbox.

CRID4FAL Time Lines

Activity Date
Call for Applications 15th Sept – 17th Oct 2016 24th Oct 2016
Dedicated Question and Answer Periods 15th Sept – 13th Oct 2016
About CRID4FAL Webinar 22nd Sept 2016
Application submission deadline 17th Oct 2016 24th Oct 2016
Shortlisted applicants invited for co-creation process announced Nov 4th 2016
Shortlisted applicants acceptance deadline Nov 21st 2016
CRID4FAL Co-creation Period Nov 28 – Jan 23, 2017
Grants awarded and finalists announced Jan 30 2017
Implementation period Feb 1 – July 30, 2017

© 2017 Makerere School of Public Health - ResilientAfrica Network , All rights reserved.

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